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Difference Between Pressed Pigment and Eyeshadow

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This is a topic that has been discussed a lot recently with the release of the Morphe x James Charles Artistry Palette… which I do have and just haven’t gotten around to playing with. Since it contains some shadows that are pressed pigments and a user on Twitter ranted for two minutes about getting hives and stained skin due to one of the pink shades in the palette. As I have not played with that palette, I cannot speak to the formula. However, I have been playing with the Jeffree Star Blood Sugar palette, which also includes pressed pigments and has a vegan formula. Plus I’ve been researching this topic as I wanted to attempt making a palette myself from scratch. So what are the main differences between eyeshadows and pressed pigments?

Jeffree Star Blood Sugar 2

 

Eyeshadows are typically made of synthetic substances made with binders and fillers, that typically need to be built up in layers to get full pigmentation though not always. Eyeshadow doesn’t last forever and while you don’t need a primer to make the shadows work, I would still recommend to use one as it makes the shadows last longer. Just make sure to set the primer first. These are made specifically for the eye area for best application, but could be use on other areas of the face.

Pressed pigments on the other than are the natural minerals without anything added into the formula. So that being iron oxides, ocher, and charcoal just to name a few. While pigments can be used to create a natural look, they are pretty finicky to use unless you put a primer on first. Unlike eyeshadows do not set the primer or you’ll have some issues with the pressed pigments.

Now specifically for vegan formulas reds, pinks, and purples are hard to create smooth and pigmented shadows without the use of dyes. Since the non-vegan alternative is crimson color created using carmine, which is a crushed beetle. Carmine is eye safe and used in many eyeshadows. But vegan brands cannot use this pigment since it’s made of an animal… obviously. However, the use of carmine does not mean it’s not cruelty free as that by definition only refers to testing products and ingredients on animals. So as I mentioned, vegan brands and other brands that don’t want to use the beetle use dyes. The FDA does not permit these pigments with color additives like Red#40 to be used around the immediate eye area. That’s not the only dye restricted, they have a whole list of restricted dyes not allowed to be intended for the eye area. Now cosmetics brands still use these dyes in their pressed pigments, but they are not allowed to call that shade an eyeshadow and it must be clearly stated on the packaging. If a customer uses it around their eyes even after getting the warning, it’s on the customer if they have a reaction or their skin is stained. Please consult your dermatologist to see if you suspect you might be allergic to one of these dyes and chose to use the formula on your eye since it’s more sensitive than other skin on your body.

That’s basically all of the differences between the two. You won’t typically notice the difference between a pressed pigment and a typical eyeshadow when applied to the eye. But you might see a difference when removing especially if it uses red lakes. I’m only mentioning this one specifically since I know a lot of people have an allergy to this dye. Plus it stains. And it’s included in both Jeffree Star Cosmetics Blood Sugar Palette and Morphe x James Charles Artistry Palette.

I hope you found this helpful or informative. I thought I would do a little something different for today. Let me know if there are any other topics like this that you would like more information on and I’ll write something up!

Jeffree Star Blood Sugar 1

Love ya,

Mae Polzine

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